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become indifferent and start joking about it, just as a counterweight."( introduces these photographs to the public for the very first time, leaving the boundary between the public and the private fractured but not unambiguously transgressed.

The spontaneously arranged photo sessions were presumed as a private act and thus not meant for publication.

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The focus of the film is, however, Kisiel’s substantial slide collection, containing images of him and his friends posing naked, in drag, or in impromptu costumes, often in arranged, but still filled with natural charm, sexual scenes. It’s difficult to stay serious when you’re surrounded by something constantly.

In some images, the emotional bonds and erotic connections between those photographed are palpable, while others resemble Robert Mapplethorpe’s earlier works.( "[T]he AIDS epidemic was a traumatic event for our gay community... Too many funerals, tragedies, death and sickness – I think people ...

Kisiel’s archive is, in Judith Butler’s terms, performative, in that it is constituted through repetition, which effectively extends beyond the original 1980s’ material in Radziszewski’s work, adding new, ever-evolving contexts.() Kisiel's flat, seen as an archival project, restores the voice to the individual, but also emphasizes the fragility of the narrative as it enters the public discourse for the first time.

Is the archive now wide open, or does it still remain largely in the proverbial closet?Allowing a website to create a cookie does not give that or any other site access to the rest of your computer, and only the site that created the cookie can read it., Jacques Derrida notes that “[e]ffective democratization can always be measured by this essential criterion: the participation in and access to the archive, its constitution, and its interpretation.”() The narratives of a communist country inevitably challenge this statement since its archive, whether understood literally or in a figurative sense as the Foucauldian “system of discursivity,” is heavily censored and inaccessible to most.This is due to, as Basiuk writes, “the difficulty of establishing with any degree of clarity the meaning of such records, testimonies and traces. [W]hat may be missing are the conditions for their legibility in the public sphere.”() His work on Kisiel’s narrative might therefore be an opportunity to question the state of the current Polish LGBTQ communities not only in relation to the communist past of the country, but also to their own status within contemporary society.In this society, liberated as it is from the former oppressive political system and from official censorship, does the emancipation of homosexual identities follow or does it fall victim to self-censorship?

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